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Hundreds of animals in forever homes following Nebraska Humane Society seizure

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OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) – Hundreds of animals have recovered and are actually in their new homes months after the Nebraska Humane Society confiscated them from a Papillion dwelling.

“600 plus animals,” says Pam Weise, the spokeswoman for NHS. “Everything from guinea pigs, and degus, and reptiles, large birds, smaller birds, some of the more exotic species.”

A majority of the animals had been uncared for and suffered from overgrown claws and beaks.

The restoration course of for the animals was no small feat.

“I believe that at the beginning it was like 50 hours a day of care is what it took,” Weise says. ‘So, it was five people working a full day, or six people coming in and out working making sure that we’re capable of look after these guys.”

Now, 4 months later, most of these animals have discovered their forever homes. All that’s left is a number of dozen birds.

“The majority of the rabbits went out, the little degus went out, some hamsters and guinea pigs, a lot of those guys are already out, a lot of the birds are gone too, we’re down to about 30 birds and maybe a couple of little guys left.”

During a time when companies throughout the board are struggling to seek out workers and fill hours, Weise says volunteer and zoo vets didn’t hesitate to step in and assist in the course of the emergency.

“It shows that the Omaha community really does come together when there is a need and there are people that can help.”

Weise says NHS has confronted staffing limitations similar to everybody else. They are budgeted to have 5 vets, however proper now, they’re down two.

Because of this, they’ve briefly closed their spay and neuter heart to make sure animals in the shelter get the correct care and check-ups they want.

“We have three vets to take care of the entire shelter, so rather than have them go over to the spay and neuter center, even though we know it’s really important, it’s one of those things that isn’t mission-critical,” Weise says. “So we have that staff shifted over to the shelter to help out over here just to make sure we can handle all the animals that need to be handled.”

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