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So where did you two meet? Readers’ nature queries

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Paddling with the children in Wexford final month, we caught this crab – solely to understand it was two crabs! We debated whether or not it was a predatory, parental or prenuptial embrace. A biologist instructed us it was a male defending a feminine throughout her moult. Really? – Ian Brunswick
It is determined by the standpoint. The male is holding on to the feminine by the legs till she moults and he can mate along with her soft-shelled physique. Then, job executed, he skedaddles.

Devil’s coach horse beetle

Myself and my five-year-old discovered this on a stroll in Bull Island. It raised its tail just a few occasions, I presume as a type of defence. What is it? – Iarlaith Greene
It is a big beetle known as the satan’s coach horse. When alarmed, it opens its ferocious jaws and raises its tail-end. Years in the past in Mayo it was thought-about very unfortunate to permit youngsters see it doing this.

Caterpillar of the pale tussock moth
Caterpillar of the pale tussock moth

I took this picture of a yellow furry caterpillar on the gates of the horses’ paddock. I believed it was superbly vivid and was fascinated, because it appeared to flaunt a pink horn and two bands like an eye fixed at me! – Siobhán Madden
Get a grip. It’s behaving like this as a result of it sees you as an enemy which may eat it and it’s attempting to discourage you. It is the caterpillar of the pale tussock moth, whose hairs may give a nasty rash if dealt with.

Cocoon of the six-spot burnet moth
Cocoon of the six-spot burnet moth

Seen on the south facet of Tralee Bay on the grass in the back of the seashore. – Jonathan Bradshaw
It is the cocoon of the six-spot burnet moth, through which the larva overwinters. It is constructed excessive on slender swaying grass stalks, making it troublesome for birds to assault it.

Angle shades moth
Angle shades moth

Please determine this moth, which flew out of backyard refuse in my Dalkey backyard. – Erica Murray
It is an angle shades moth.

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